Serve as a Fellow with I Will Survive, Inc.

Military

Through the Mission Continues’ Fellowship Program, selected veterans volunteer part-time for six months with I Will Survive, Inc. In return, Fellows receive a living stipend, complete a leadership development curriculum and develop new skills and networks. The Fellowship Program is ideal for veterans looking to start a new career, gain practical work experience while attending school or for a new way to serve at home. Find out more at www.MissionContinues.org (open to post-9/11 veterans)

Need: Honorable Discharge, DD214, Clean Criminal Record, and signed Memorandum of Understanding.

  • Attend a three-day fellowship orientation (coming up in Atlanta).
  • Gain additional leadership skills as a civilian.
  • Transfer military skills to the civilian workforce.
  • Gain public speaking skills.
  • Obtain networks for future careers after the fellowship.
  • Become active citizens in the community.
  • Gain mentorship and coaching from a Certified Professional Life Coach free of charge.
  • Work directly with the Executive Director of I Will Survive, Inc., who is also a veteran who served two tours in Iraq, obtained a Bachelor of Arts in Speech Communications and will obtain a Masters in Public Administration.

Please visit the host organization at www.IWillSurviveInc.org to gain more information. Email contact@iwillsurviveinc.org if you are interested to serve again!

“The best way to find yourself is to lose yourself in the service of others.” – Mahatma Gandhi

I Will Survive, Inc. 5879 New Peachtree Rd., Suite D., Atlanta, GA 30340

Phone 404.483.8503 Fax 800.880.1586

Are you a well-rounded community leader?

What makes a person well-rounded? How about a well-rounded community leader? Perhaps the careers they have held in their life, the various business and personal relationships that were successful and not so successful, the emotional roller-coasters of dealing with financial loss and gain in addition to dealing with physical loss of human beings, all make up some of the ingredients in a well-rounded community leader.

All of the aforementioned examples can be summed up into stress. A hypothesis of a well-rounded community leader could be someone that can handle stress and still lead from the front. Serving on a non-profit board can be stressful. You have to deal with making the time (not finding the time) to give, figuring out your best traits or talents to give, and opening your wallet to give your treasure to a cause you believe in and/or raising the funds to keep those programs running. These three most critical areas of what makes a good board member are summed up in time, talent, and treasure.

What if you are not able to make a whole lot of time because of your new twins with your spouse? What if your home is going through foreclosure and feel you do not have the extra funds to donate to that cause you care about? What if you are getting complacent and rusty on your talent because you really feel stuck in a career you no longer enjoy? This type of stress is caused by worry. What if… what if… what if! You could go on all day with what ifs, so why do we do it to ourselves?

Dr. Wayne W. Dyer defines worry as “the act of becoming immobilized in the present moment as a result of things that are going, or are not going, to happen in the future.” You can be a well-rounded community leader. Most well-rounded community leaders have sat on non-profit boards and some have sat on many more than one non-profit organization over a course of five years. Consider sitting on a nonprofit board. Erase the stress of worry out of your mind. Get mobilized in this present moment and start now.

In Service,

AP

Read more: http://www.oprah.com/spirit/How-to-Eliminate-Worry-From-Your-Life-Wayne-Dyer#ixzz3hUEpGaSF

Graduate School

RibbonCutting

I started my own nonprofit organization to serve fighters of breast cancer after losing my own mother to breast cancer. On her birthday this year, she would have been 63 years young. Since starting my nonprofit organization, I realized that everyone in my field was typically male, caucasian, over 50 years of age, had an advanced degree, and was considered pretty wealthy. I knew my nonprofit would struggle so I had to strategize this accurately in order for my nonprofit to survive. I decided to go back to school. I could not decide between getting a degree in the communications field (Masters in Mass Communications) or something else. I looked up schools inside the United States and then I knew my next step. I would obtain my Masters in Public Administration concentrating on Nonprofit Management. I already had the communications skills I needed. I needed to grow in dealing with the various public entities as this is what I would be doing with my nonprofit organization. I also knew that I made some simple mistakes that could have been avoided in the start up process if I only had a mentor or personal experience in the nonprofit sector already. I was accepted to the University of Central Florida and did not even wait for the other letters of acceptance to come through. My GRE was waived because of my field experience in the nonprofit sector. I made one visit with my sister and knew this was the right decision. The traveling back and forth between two states began to weigh on me but I could not give up. I was on my way to becoming a better me for my nonprofit strategically. When there are things we truly want in life, we make the sacrifices to make it happen. People ask me all the time how to start a nonprofit organization and want to start one on their own. Most do not after they realize all the work, time, money, and dedication it takes. This is my purpose. Higher education is key. What are you waiting for? AP